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Monday, January 18, 2010

Privilege

Life can be hard. I have had my fair share of struggles in my life. I still struggle. Some days I struggle to be patient with a boy who wakes multiple times at night and wants to start his day at 4am. I struggle with a girl who is, well, three. I struggle to find the time and energy to connect with the husband. Those struggles sometimes overwhelmed me. They make me feel inadequate and insufficient. But really? My hard is privileged.

My house is standing. My kitchen is stocked with fresh food and clean drinking water runs through my taps. My children are alive and healthy. They are clothed and fed and loved. They are entertained and educated and encouraged. Because really? My children are privileged.

Money is tighter now then it has been before and than it will be when we are both working again. We are careful how we spend our money. We pay our bills and the girl's preschool and we discuss any other major purchases together. We feel like we have no money even though the husband has a regular paycheck, we have savings to draw from and I could return to work if it was necessary. So really? We are privileged.

I haven't been watching the news of Haiti because we don't have cable. I haven't searched out pictures of the devastation online. I don't feel like I need a visual of the destruction because the pictures I have imagined in my mind are enough for me. Instead, I listen to the radio and pause whatever I am doing when news of Haiti comes on.

Since the earthquake I have felt like we needed to do sometimes. Today we finally sat down and made an online donation to the Canadian Red Cross effort in Haiti. It is not as big a donation as I would like to have made, but it is something. Perhaps we will donate again later. Because giving to Haiti? It is my privilege.

13 comments:

  1. exactly! You've captured the sentiment beautifully.

    thanks for the reminder.

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  2. Good for you for doing what you can. This was a beautiful post, and so very true. I was in Florida when the earthquake happened and wasn't watching the news very much, and I was also off-line. I finally grasped what really happened when I got home and turned on CNN. I shed quite a few tears, shaking my head in disbelief. I'm sad, I feel like it is a hopeless situation, I can't get over the fact that so many innocent lives were lost. The children, hungry, broken families, lost homes... it's all too much, really. We are very blessed to be living where we do, to have a roof over our heads. I struggle with my 4 year old sometimes, and still wake up at night with my 2 year old, and I have to remember that the situation I'm in is golden in comparison to the problems going on around the world right now.

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  3. Definitely something to think about the next time we complain about having no money. When the basics are covered - shelter, food, water, clothing, what more do you really need?

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  4. I wrote a far less eloquent post on a similar theme.
    I go through my life appreciating the highs and complaining about the lows; but really I don't know a thing about low.
    I am trying to put a greater effort into being grateful for all those things that I take for granted. I admit that it is work. Because really? I have been spoiled, after all I am privileged.

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  5. Brie, you have such a beautiful heart. It's my privilege to *know* you. Such a well-written post!

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  6. well sad brie. there are so many worthy charities to give to. cbc.ca has a list of reputable online charities to donate to if your readers are wonder which ones to go to. also, somthing a little more tangible: feet first shoe stores are collecting gently used shoes over the course of the week and will be sending them to haiti through the charity soles for souls. i've got a couple of the jeelybean's shoes that are still good, as wlel as come of mine and the hubby's.

    it's good to take stock.

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  7. Amazing post. Well done. We've made our donation for many of the same reasons you've listed - hard not to while we sat in the warmth of our home, kids playing and leisure of life at our finger tips.

    well written

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  8. It's not Feet First it's Soft Moc. Sorry for any confusion!

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  9. Wow. Eye opening post. I'd like to share it with my jr high English class if you wouldn't mind?
    You could dm me on twitter @dawnbheag or email me: gaelic.dawn at gmail.com

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  10. Beautiful, heartfelt post. I just posted about it too, but I imagine the media coverage is much more prevalent where you are because you are closer.

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  11. It certainly puts everything into perspective doesn't it. We have to remind ourselves every so often. So tragic in these circumstances

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  12. We are indeed privileged. My daughter donated the content of her piggy bank, it wouldn't have gotten her much here but hearing about the conditions over there, it could probably feed a family.. So sad and overwhelming. X

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  13. Beautifully, eloquently written. Thank you xx

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